Arch. Myriam B. Mahiques Curriculum Vitae

Sunday, February 15, 2015

The shadow of a chair. La sombra de una silla



It is well understood that architecture is not interior decor. Though, there are lots of architects who dedicate to the design of furniture, which at last are part of the architecture.
I´m more positioned on Loos´ side, good architecture, in my humble opinion, doesn´t need any decoration. But how dull a kitchen would look without the table, and the clothes, and the chairs....
I am trying to show here how a simple element, like a white leather chair can produce an interesting effect in a boring corner of the kitchen, a concept that makes me think twice about my Loos´ position, at least today, while having breakfast and enjoying the sunlight through the glass doors at 8 AM.

Somebody, and most probably my husband, has left the chair aside, and the hard shadow was drawn on it and on the free standing freezer. Besides, there´s the white shutters behind. All of a sudden, there´s an interesting effect.
Though I was expecting I could take a couple of bright white abstract pictures, my camera wouldn´t allow me to, so I switched to expressionist shots to illustrate my point.







Sunday, January 18, 2015

Transmission Towers


There are transmission towers everywhere and there is no mystery about them. But I find them fascinating when they are in a background of a cloudy blue sky. That's the color through my cell phone, sometimes my crappy cell is better than my camera for colors.

Saturday, January 10, 2015

Textures of old brick, wood and cement


My pictures of the interesting textures of old bricks in combination with wood and cement. Taken at the Mission of San Juan Capistrano, December 16th 2014.







Saturday, November 15, 2014

Reading Architecture: Literary Imagination and Architectural Experience. CALL FOR PAPERS

Reading Architecture: Literary Imagination and Architectural Experience

Location:    Greece
Symposium Date:    2015-06-16

Call for papers:
Professor Aulis Blomstedt used to advice his students at the Helsinki University of Technology that the capacity to imagine situations of life is a more important talent for an architect than the gift of fantasizing space. From the small scale of the domestic environment to the level of the city, literature has systematically provided us with detailed and compelling explorations of situations of life. As sociologist Robert Park famously declared we are mainly indebted to writers of fiction for our more intimate knowledge of contemporary urban life. A primary means of representation of human reality, dealing since the 19th century even with questions that had traditionally been the province of philosophy, literature focuses on the ever-changing and difficult to grasp conditions of human life, the very life that buildings, places and cities, surround, enclose, and enable.

Departing from this conviction, the symposium wishes to explore how the literary production of modernity can enlighten architects and urban planners in understanding and valorizing qualitative characteristics of the contemporary life they are called to design for. These situations of life could include a focused look into people’s everyday private and public lives, small or big scale events in human-built environments, socio-cultural and political phenomena in urban contexts. We understand these situations as place-bound (place specific) architectural experiences that allow for a qualitative, emotional and embodied apprehension of the world.

The symposium invites papers on the above categories of architectural experiences as captured in literature, to open up a discussion on how they can inform and inspire architects and architecture nowadays. It also invites papers with a pedagogical focus, exploring how the emotional, intersubjective and place-bounded worlds that literature reveals to us, can enrich architectural design and education.

The symposium will take place at Athens' Benaki Museum from June 16th to 18th, 2015.

Submission deadlineJanuary 15, 2015

For more information, plesae visit www.readingarchitecture.org

Call for papers:
Professor Aulis Blomstedt used to advice his students at the Helsinki University of Technology that the capacity to imagine situations of life is a more important talent for an architect than the gift of fantasizing space. From the small scale of the domestic environment to the level of the city, literature has systematically provided us with detailed and compelling explorations of situations of life. As sociologist Robert Park famously declared we are mainly indebted to writers of fiction for our more intimate knowledge of contemporary urban life. A primary means of representation of human reality, dealing since the 19th century even with questions that had traditionally been the province of philosophy, literature focuses on the ever-changing and difficult to grasp conditions of human life, the very life that buildings, places and cities, surround, enclose, and enable.
Departing from this conviction, the symposium wishes to explore how the literary production of modernity can enlighten architects and urban planners in understanding and valorizing qualitative characteristics of the contemporary life they are called to design for. These situations of life could include a focused look into people’s everyday private and public lives, small or big scale events in human-built environments, socio-cultural and political phenomena in urban contexts. We understand these situations as place-bound (place specific) architectural experiences that allow for a qualitative, emotional and embodied apprehension of the world.
The symposium invites papers on the above categories of architectural experiences as captured in literature, to open up a discussion on how they can inform and inspire architects and architecture nowadays. It also invites papers with a pedagogical focus, exploring how the emotional, intersubjective and place-bounded worlds that literature reveals to us, can enrich architectural design and education.
The symposium will take place at Athens' Benaki Museum from June 16th to 18th, 2015.
Submission deadlineJanuary 15, 2015
For more information, plesae visit www.readingarchitecture.org

Sunday, October 26, 2014

My selected screen shots from The Cabinet of Dr Caligari






¨The Cabinet of Dr. Caligari (German: Das Cabinet des Dr. Caligari) is a 1920 German silent horror film directed by Robert Wiene from a screenplay by Hans Janowitz and Carl Mayer. It is one of the most influential films of the German Expressionist movement and, according to Roger Ebert, is "the first true horror film".[1] The film used stylized sets, with abstract, jagged buildings painted on canvas backdrops and flats. To add to this strange style, the actors used an unrealistic technique that exhibited "jerky" and dance-like movements.[1] This film is cited as having introduced the twist ending in cinema.[2] The premiere of a digitally restored version of the film took place at the 64th Berlin International Film Festival in February 2014.[3] This restoration had its U.S. premiere at the San Francisco Silent Film Festival "Silent Autumn" event at the Castro Theatre on September 20, 2014.¨

Wednesday, September 17, 2014

Architectural photography of ¨Delicatessen¨


I don´t like French movies too much, but Delicatessen (1991) is one of my favorites. I´ve watched it three times, and now, I´ve been focused on the architectural photography that somehow reminded me the post michael wolf frames abstract views of parisian rooftops at Designboom, where the Parisian roofs are shown as abstract pictures, out of context.
These scenes look like paintings, some of them Surrealist, other Expressionist.
I am sharing today some screen shots from my computer, being in my humble opinion, the greenest, the best ones.



The man in his paper disguise is astonishing, a piece of art hanging from the staircase. Let´s say a beautiful paper sculpture.



The scene is reinforced by the snails and the water flooding the room. A dynamic scene with organic components.

The tunnels

The rooftops 

A rooftop like a Surrealist painting at the end of the movie

Friday, July 4, 2014

Colorful Los Angeles, California


Every time we go to Los Angeles, my husband is the driver so I have the opportunity to enjoy the murals and if he´s not driving fast, I can also take some casual pictures. 
Los Angeles is not exactly the city that is shown in Hollywood movies; setting aside the concentration of towers in downtown (not too much of them, compared to New York or Buenos Aires), there are low constructions, very colorful with murals in latino neighborhoods.
Here you have my last pictures, the area is next to the city of Alhambra:




A nice surprise: our dear Lionel Messi is looking at us while waiting for the green light.

Our dear Messi!

The following pictures were taken in 2012.


This one is in the Civic Center of East Los Angeles, this shot is older, from the construction times.

Here, a detail of Mercado La Paloma mural

Mercado La Paloma

A Mexican restaurant in Los Angeles

The Mayan Theater in downtown Los Angeles

Tuesday, June 24, 2014

Relaxing at the Huntington Library and Gardens


Two women relaxing under the beautiful gallery in Huntington Library and Gardens, city of San Marino, California, USA. My pictures, dated May 10th 2014.


A (Roman?) bust, in the same gallery, attached to the stucco wall


Another bust, and on the background, the Huntington Library.

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